Posts Tagged ‘mobile browsers’

5 Prerequisites For Successful Customer Engagement

November 30th, 2011 by

The day has finally come. The relationship between the two of you has seen its up and downs, but you both are ready for the next step. The pit in your stomach is only outweighed by your intense need for one another. You toss all doubts and the butterflies aside, slowly bend down and rest your knee to the floor and fumble around in your pocket for that expensive little detail. There’s nothing more left than to pull out your mobile phone, take a breath and lay it all on the line—“will you buy my product?”

Granted this may be just a slight stretch from reality, but mobile user engagement should be treated with just as much due diligence as popping The Question. Whether you’re a first timer or a seasoned mobile pro, these 5 questions should guide you through the many pitfalls of the constantly evolving mobile landscape and help you design the user experience that delivers pure bliss. Read the rest of this entry »

The day has finally come. The relationship between the two of you has seen its up and downs, but you both are ready for the next step. The pit in your stomach is only outweighed by your intense need for ... Read More


Boost Your Mobile Site’s Appeal: Offline Storage

October 11th, 2011 by

To close out our five part series on how to add features that maximize a mobile site’s appeal, let’s explore a relatively new mobile technology — offline storage. Unlike the first four features in this series (location functionality, a whiz-bang UI, a touch-optimized UI, social networking) offline storage is largely untapped, primarily because it is still not widely supported by the browsers. But, as support for offline storage and other sophisticated features becomes more widespread, we are bound to see more and more mobile web apps and sites that utilize this important functionality. In the meantime, let’s take a look at some innovative examples that are utilizing offline storage today. Read the rest of this entry »

To close out our five part series on how to add features that maximize a mobile site’s appeal, let’s explore a relatively new mobile technology — offline storage. Unlike the first four features in this series (location functionality, a whiz-bang ... Read More


Mobile Website vs. App: Top 9 Dilemmas

August 3rd, 2011 by

Mobile Website v.s. AppBusinesses are rapidly moving towards utilizing the mobile device as an integral part of their marketing strategies. Mobile marketing spending is expected to quadruple to $1.2 billion (yes, with a ‘B’)  in 2015, from $313 million just a year ago, according to ABI Research. However, the larger the role that mobile plays as a marketing channel, the more choices that must be made in how to deploy the marketing message. One common question is whether to prioritize developing a native smartphone application or providing customers with a mobile-optimized website. There are many advantages in favor of the latter, particularly for companies just getting their feet wet in the mobile pool.

Broad Distribution and Large Market Size: There is a reason they call it the World Wide Web:  it is accessible to everyone. With 35% of American adults using an Android device, 24% using an iPhone and another 24% using BlackBerry, you’re probably thinking that it’d be great to reach ALL of them. With a mobile optimized website you actually can (even those with simpler phones). Furthermore, mobile sites can help boost traffic to your traditional website and social media presence, thereby increasing your distribution even further.

Less $$$: From both a cost and a revenue perspective, mobile websites win over apps hands-down. But development costs for iPhone apps can run at least $35K for a reasonably functional app. Adding Android and Blackberry, will bring you to $105K+. Mobile websites are significantly less expensive because there is no need to develop three or four different versions to cover multiple OEM’s. As for revenue, would you rather keep all your proceeds or only 70%?  Enough said.

Faster Time to Market: Closely linked to the cost issue, it is MUCH quicker to optimize your existing website for mobile devices than it is to create a mobile app from scratch and complete the approval process.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Businesses are rapidly moving towards utilizing the mobile device as an integral part of their marketing strategies. Mobile marketing spending is expected to quadruple to $1.2 billion (yes, with a ‘B’)  in 2015, from $313 million just a year ago, ... Read More


Mobile Web Advantage #1: The Mobile Web Builds on Existing Habits

July 27th, 2011 by

Last week we launched the first in a series of posts exploring the benefits of mobile websites. This second post dives into one such benefit: The Mobile Web Builds on Existing Habits.

One common decision that a business faces when deploying a mobile strategy is whether it should place a higher priority on developing a native smartphone application or on creating a mobile website. One of the key advantages of having a mobile website is that it allows you to capitalize on the existing behavior of your customers because of the similarities in user experience between the mobile and the tethered web.

For example, consumers are accustomed to opening their Firefox or Safari browsers and typing the URL to get to a website on the PC-based web. They are also accustomed to searching for information via a keyword within a search engine. Likewise, it is easy to enter a URL into a mobile browser or search by keyword using Google or Bing on a mobile device. In contrast, the process to search for and discover an application in the App Store, download it, sign up, and finally use the app is quite cumbersome.

Read the rest of this entry »

Last week we launched the first in a series of posts exploring the benefits of mobile websites. This second post dives into one such benefit: The Mobile Web Builds on Existing Habits. One common decision that a business faces when ... Read More


The ever shifting, dizzying world of mobile browsers. Getting the answers from Opera, RIM and Nokia.

July 6th, 2011 by

It’s not often that the developer community gets an opportunity to corner the OEMs and ask them to do some explaining. Yet, that is exactly what Jeremy Keith was able to accomplish with Nokia, Opera and RIM at Mobilism 2011, during a session focusing on mobile browsers. Apple and Google were (of course) MIA. And while their presence could’ve provided additional perspectives, I suspect the gist of the discussion would be unaltered.

Mr. Keith did an excellent job asking pointed and relevant questions. Unfortunately, the responses were largely unsatisfying – not inspiring much confidence that there is a clear and cohesive direction across the OEMs in regards to browsers. I found the discussions around zoom controls and content re-flow particularly interesting, as not only each OEM approached it from a different angle, some OEMs handled it differently depending on which version of the browser was used. These are exactly the types of things that cause some of the most baffling and frustrating problems with trying to create mobile optimized content that looks consistently good on a multitude of devices (yes, still true even if they limit the discussion to WebKit-based browsers).

Of course, the panel concluded with the usual upbeat message that it will get better soon as things get standardized… You don’t have to be a long-time mobile developer to have a déjà vu experience when hearing those words. Still, it was quite satisfying to see the OEMs face the music for once. And if nothing else, the discussion provided a broad, dizzying introduction into the complexities of accommodating the range of nuances across mobile browsers.

(See panel transcript, video and audio for more details)

It’s not often that the developer community gets an opportunity to corner the OEMs and ask them to do some explaining. Yet, that is exactly what Jeremy Keith was able to accomplish with Nokia, Opera and RIM at Mobilism 2011, ... Read More