Trilibis Blog

Can a turnkey digital signage solution make sense for smaller businesses?

May 17th, 2018 by

The latest turnkey systems can deliver performance and flexibility with minimal capital expenditure.

radiant screeens case study

These days, digital signage is everywhere you look. Perhaps because we’re getting so used to spending time looking at one screen or another, its pervasiveness is hardly surprising. It can now make a lot of sense for a small multi-location business or franchise operation to install a digital signage solution. Some of the benefits include improved customer engagement, offering targeted promotions, generating advertising revenue, and customer insights derived from analytics.

But the associated costs with a proprietary system can be daunting: the enclosure, a media player, content creation, integration, maintenance, and content management. For many of these businesses, choosing a system that’s based on open standards, and that can utilize existing assets, can pencil out in the long run. But beyond the hardware and software, what are the other potential hurdles?

Certainly, one thing is clear in the emerging digital signage landscape: bad content really does stand out. We’ve probably all seen content problems: content that’s not properly formatted, content with too much animation, stale/old content, confusing content, badly designed content, and so on.

The challenges that confront a small business looking to implement digital signage are well described in this excellent article: “Avoiding 11 digital signage pitfalls.” Here are some of the guidelines that are applicable to a business owner who’s considering installing a digital signage solution:

  1. Avoid confusing content, too much movement, and poor-quality images.
  2. Tailor your content for the screens you’ll be using.
  3. Understand your audience and choose content that will appeal to your target audience
  4. Integrate a relevant call to action that will engage your target audience.
  5. Plan for updates and for upgradeability / scalability.
  6. Consider roles (manager vs. other team members) and associated access rights.

Some of these considerations came up for discussion during a recent Radiant Screens client integration. The business owner (who operates several grocery stores and restaurants) needed a solution that would integrate quickly into his existing IT set-up and use his existing hardware. In response, we proposed a pilot system that met the following parameters, in order of importance to the client:

   Minimal capex
   Avoid using proprietary hardware
   Can update content to digital screens on the fly using a mobile phone
   Can be up and running within an hour, using existing screens
   Can easily deploy content to multiple locations
   Can display images, videos, playlists, etc.
   Supports touch display for ordering

Since the client already had existing digital displays in place, implementing the Radiant Screens solution took very little time. Content was uploaded to the platform, generic Android players were plugged into the display screens, and then playlists were created and published out to the various locations.

Initial feedback is that the system itself was incredibly easy to set up and use. Since it is cloud-based, the Radiant Screens solution is essentially turnkey. It was also noted that the ability to change content on the fly via a mobile device is incredibly powerful, especially since promotions and inventory change frequently.

Contact us here if you’d like to learn how to design and implement a customer-engagement system based on the latest digital signage and large-format displays.

The latest turnkey systems can deliver performance and flexibility with minimal capital expenditure. These days, digital signage is everywhere you look. Perhaps because we’re getting so used to spending time looking at one screen or another, its pervasiveness is hardly ... Read More


The first-ever Trilibis customer engagement round-up

April 22nd, 2018 by

In this edition: retail truths, creating a UX strategy, Going Big on CX, and an RIP to the traditional marketer

engagement

The world of retail continues to evolve at a furious pace. It seems only yesterday that we were pondering the possible demise of ‘bricks-and-mortar’ retail under the etail juggernaut. And now we’re witnessing Amazon opening its own Main Street stores. Fast times indeed!

Perhaps one conclusion from this is that omnichannel retail is what it’s always been about. In this post, we highlight some interesting nuggets from around the web that serve to illustrate why engagement and experience are what truly differentiate brands in the minds of consumers.

Let’s start here, with this article that highlights the core truths of high-tech retail that were discussed at this year’s Shoptalk retail conference in Las Vegas. One enduring trend that we’ve been following is the blending of digital content with an understanding of a customer’s unique preferences and needs. Mind you, we’re not so sure that “phygital” will stick around as a word…

Increasingly, customers expect a cohesive, personalized experience, so retailers need to focus on providing a seamless, integrated customer journey. Manifestations include fast, on-demand delivery, and a bricks-and-mortar presence that organically integrates mobile and provides easy checkout. It’s a difficult balancing act, but successful companies will merge the accessibility of digital with the comfort of personal interactions (hence the increasingly popular term “phygital”).

Clearly, it is not news that companies need to adapt to an increasingly digital environment. What is new, though, is the combination of a personal element with high-tech insight to personalize the consumer experience. Customers now want — and increasingly, expect — a bespoke experience in retail. The brands that can provide this are the ones who will succeed in the coming years, while those who are slow to adapt will be left behind.

We’ve talked before on this blog about the importance of ensuring a consistent brand experience across channels and touchpoints. The article on the Adobe blog dives deeper into the topic of creating a UX strategy from the perspective of the designer who is creating customer journeys:

“The customer journey spans a variety of touchpoints by which the customer moves from awareness to engagement and purchase. Successful brands focus on developing a seamless experience that ensures each touchpoint interconnects and contributes to the overall journey.” [Forrester]
This idea — of a seamless and well-designed experience and a journey through a brand — should lie at the heart of a considered UX strategy. To design truly memorable experiences, we need to focus not just on websites or apps, but on all of the touchpoints a user might come into contact with.

This Forbes article, meanwhile, discusses why Thom Gruhler of Fjuri Group believes brands need to start Thinking Big when it comes to customer experience:

Gruhler: “When you think about CX broadly, it has to start with understanding your customer journey. This is the first step and it’s much easier said than done because there is no one single journey, except at the individual level. Companies today have to understand various customer journeys at the segment level. And if they have multiple channels, it’s across multiple touchpoints. Understanding this journey takes hard work. The second step is designing experiences that are informed by personal information and the job to do, rather than just operational defects. A lot of companies look for points of the defect, versus trying to also understand opportunities to strengthen and enhance the experience. When you do this, customer satisfaction goes up. The challenge for marketers is taking the time to understand the journey pulls them out of the more urgent work, and this comes with a significantly high cost if you can’t move the rest of the business forward at the same time.”

And I’ll close this update with this sound advice  for marketers to abandon traditional marketing approaches and instead engage with their audiences where they spend their time:

Trying to interact and engage with audiences at every touchpoint is like trying to hit a moving target. Monitoring each and every platform, app or medium where consumers can be talking about a brand is exhausting and rarely productive. CMOs must therefore focus their marketing efforts on the channels where consumers are spending most of their time. Engaging with those audiences through those channels is a good first step, but it shouldn’t end there.

Contact us here if you’d like to learn how Trilibis technology can shorten your time to market and optimize your enterprise web content management or customer engagement system for omnichannel digital marketing, from mobile to the latest digital signage and large-format displays.

In this edition: retail truths, creating a UX strategy, Going Big on CX, and an RIP to the traditional marketer The world of retail continues to evolve at a furious pace. It seems only yesterday that we were pondering the ... Read More


Why digital signage content silos are bad for omnichannel engagement

March 12th, 2018 by

Unless digital content management systems factor digital signage into their omnichannel offerings, point solutions will fill the void with content silos tied to specific signage applications

Silos

 

Twelve years ago, channel-specific content strategies were all the rage. Remember m-dot websites? These were the mobile-specific websites that were created alongside regular ‘desktop’ websites because mobile phones, back then, were incapable of handling full-bore HTML. At the time, it made sense: a new channel for customer engagement was emerging, and marketers were eager to connect with consumers on their mobile phones. So, they built what were effectively isolated content silos to address mobile users.

Running two sites side-by-side was complicated and fraught with problems, chief among the difficulty of ensuring alignment of the content on both sites (a classic content silo negative). This all changed when iPhone was launched, with its built-in Safari browser that could even load the desktop version of nytimes.com. Within a few years, marketers would abandon their m-dot silos in favor of a unified, mobile-first approach to their website content. Ensuring alignment of content across websites, email marketing programs, and various other channels drove the need for enterprise web content management (WCM) systems to manage and deploy omnichannel content and measure engagement.

In recent years, new channels have emerged for engagement with consumers: social media, mobile apps, SMS and chat, Internet of Things (IoT) such as wearables, smart home devices and other Internet-connected devices. In response, content management systems have embraced these new channels to provide a unified approach to content dissemination.

Signage silos are the comeback kid of content

Now, it looks like content silos may be making a comeback for one channel in particular: digital signage. Why? Because it’s gigantic opportunity that is fragmented across different industries and devices. Grand View Research is predicting the digital signage market will double from the 2016 figure of 16 billion to almost 32 billion by 2025, with the primary driver for that accredited to “the increasing demand for the digital promotion of products and services so as to attract the attention of the target audience in an effective manner.

With such a huge opportunity, it’s perhaps no surprise that the market resembles the Wild West. Digital signage can be bewildering for end users trying to develop and deploy the infrastructure on their own. It’s a complex undertaking that requires expertise in a variety of areas such as IT, audiovisual, software, mechanical and display technologies. Signage vendors have stepped up to the challenge by offering complete and customized digital signage solutions consisting of displays, web-based content management and supporting services, among other offerings. Meanwhile, value-added retailers (VARs) are offering complete solutions that incorporate products from various hardware and software vendors.

The signage silo antidote

While a point-solution approach may make sense for some digital signage applications, it will likely prove costly and complicated for the larger applications: retail, corporate, banking, healthcare, education, and transportation (retail being the largest of all). Typically, with every new digital touchpoint, companies often take the misstep of creating new standalone content silos, which inadvertently introduces inefficiencies and complexities into the content creation workflow.

A key area of interest for omnichannel marketers will be how to adapt their brand content which, until now, has been presented on desktop/laptop browsers, tablets and smartphones, for these new, larger devices. These include video walls, video screens, transparent LED screens, digital posters, kiosks, and others. We predict that all the major enterprise content management system suppliers will include digital signage as just another channel, which will enable marketers to avoid signage-content silos and design/deploy a unified content strategy from a common asset repository across all devices.

Contact us here if you’d like to learn how Trilibis technology can shorten your time to market and adapt your enterprise web content management or customer engagement system to the latest digital signage and large-format displays.

 

Unless digital content management systems factor digital signage into their omnichannel offerings, point solutions will fill the void with content silos tied to specific signage applications   Twelve years ago, channel-specific content strategies were all the rage. Remember m-dot websites? ... Read More


CES 2018: Display technology advances and cross-category devices

January 18th, 2018 by

As display technology follows Moore’s Law, new opportunities present themselves for brands and marketers

CES-2018

CES 2018 is now behind us. So, before the dust settles and the big mobile show of the year fires up (Mobile World Congress is in just over a month), here’s our round-up of some of the mobile and display innovations from CES that are focused on display and engagement technologies.

Smartphones

With some manufacturers retrenching from this ultra-competitive sector in recent years, it has become dominated by several brands such as Apple, Asus, Google, HTC, Huawei, LG, and Samsung. So, it was good to see Sony making a comeback. Another brand that has made major advances recently is Vivo, which announced an in-screen fingerprint sensor, and Honor, which is looking to break into the US market. Also of note is the emergence of hybrid concepts such as the Razor Project Linda, that seeks to combine separate devices into one.

Laptops & tablets

Acer and Dell innovated their way toward increasingly thin and lightweight laptops, while HP and Lenovo showcased their latest convertible devices. Also arriving soon in a kitchen near you is the JBL Link View, which adds a high-resolution display to the Google Home platform.

Wearable/VR

High-resolution displays are increasingly integrated with wearable and AR/VR devices, which will provide interesting platforms for brands and marketers. Some that stood out for us are the Vuzix Blade, the wireless VR headset from Google and Lenovo, and the Skagen Falster touchscreen smartwatch.

Displays

The amazing LG OLED canyon shows how an alternate reality doesn’t have to be strapped onto your head. And just as US consumers are seeing 4K displays become affordable, LG previewed an 88-inch 8K display. Samsung, Sony and TCL also announced incredible innovations in display technology, while Asus previewed a smart TV for gamers.

As the landscape of display technology continues to expand, customer engagement on these new devices is a must. If you’re a developer of an enterprise WCM or CCM system, you’ll want to make sure your software users are assured of the best experience when their customers view brand content on these new devices. That’s where Trilibis can help you. With more than a decade of experience optimizing content presentation on mobile devices and digital displays large and small, our technology automatically adapts marketing content to the latest devices better than anything else on the market.

Other approaches adapt content to some of a device’s attributes. With Trilibis technology, you can make your content device-aware — meaning that you can take advantage of unique attributes of a particular device (such as local services or hardware options), and preview them on our web based emulator to deliver a truly optimized experience for the end user.

Contact us here if you’d like to learn how Trilibis technology can shorten your time to market and adapt your enterprise web content management or customer engagement system to the latest customer-engagement devices and displays.

 

As display technology follows Moore’s Law, new opportunities present themselves for brands and marketers CES 2018 is now behind us. So, before the dust settles and the big mobile show of the year fires up (Mobile World Congress is in ... Read More


What’s on tap for brand content marketers in 2018?

December 19th, 2017 by

Retailers and brands must have an agile content strategy to keep pace with an evolving array of customer-engagement channels

customer engagement

Mary Meeker’s most recent analysis of the internet (Internet Trends Report, 2017) highlights some key global trends that retailers, brands, and developers of content management systems should be tracking.

Core usage trends
There are 3.4 billion users to target, most of them (2.8 billion) have a smartphone, and the gap between mobile versus desktop engagement is widening

   User growth is holding steady at +10% per year (the number of global internet users is equal to 46% of the world’s population—more than double the 2009 figure).
   Smartphone shipments and user (installed base) growth are slowing; (+3% and 12%, respectively).
   Internet usage (engagement) grew at +4% Y/Y; mobile >3 hours/day per user vs. <1 five years ago (USA).
   The emerging “fully digital” younger generation will consume pretty much everything on their smartphones.

Advertising and ecommerce
Growth in online advertising is accelerating.

   Digital advertising rose 22% to $73 billion last year, up from 20% in 2015 and 15% in 2014.
   The growth is coming from mobile ads, which is offsetting a decline in desktop ads.

The pace of ecommerce growth is up, rising steadily from 14% in 2013 to 15% last year.
   Visual media are at the heart of online engagement strategies for retailers and brands.
   The future of search will increasingly include pictures over keywords.
   Forward-thinking retailers and brands are enabling users to use context-inferred images and video to replace typing… and this is enabling image-driven storefronts in social media and emails.
   Images are enabling some very successful content-marketing strategies employed by some retailers

New brands, new channels, channel cross-overs
   The emergence of digital-native brands (such as Warby Parker and Bonobos) is transitioning to the arrival of these same brand opening Main Street storefronts.
   The channels for advertising and selling products are expanding: desktop browser, mobile browser, native mobile apps, home voice appliances, in-person/IRL stores and venues…
   …which underscores the importance of ensuring your brand content can easily be adapted to these new channels

Is your content ready for 2018?
It’s clear that brand content must be at the heart of retailers’ and big brands’ customer engagement strategy. This means it must be mobile optimized AND easily repurposed into new channels such as home voice appliances, in-store signs, and (soon) augmented reality. Have a great holiday season — we’ll see you in 2018!

Retailers and brands must have an agile content strategy to keep pace with an evolving array of customer-engagement channels Mary Meeker’s most recent analysis of the internet (Internet Trends Report, 2017) highlights some key global trends that retailers, brands, and ... Read More