Trilibis Blog

Are some responsive design websites unresponsive?

September 29th, 2014 by

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This article was originally published in the July 2014 issue of Internet Retailing

With mobile devices becoming popular for online shopping, mobile-friendly responsive design websites can deliver an excellent visual experience for visitors. However, Trilibis finds that operators of image-rich websites need to pay special attention to image weight and its effect on page-load times.

By Ted Verani

Has mobile caught your attention, yet?

In May of this year, e-tailers around the world eagerly anticipated the latest annual update from the oracle of the internet, Mary Meeker. This year’s report[i] by the influential KPCB analyst highlighted some of the major trends in Internet, social, mobile and digital media that e-tailers must factor into their web development strategies.

Mobile featured prominently in this year’s report. KPCB found that global mobile internet usage increased from 14 percent to 25 percent between May 2013 and May 2014. That increase was most pronounced in Europe, where mobile internet usage as percentage of total web pages views jumped from 8 percent to 16 percent (compared with growth of 11 percent to 19 percent in North America).

For online retailers, one very interesting mobile factoid in this year’s report concerns tablets: unit growth was 52 percent over last year, a massive jump that is surely reflected in this year’s server logs of any marketer. This mirrors the findings of comScore Inc., which reported that one-third of online shoppers at the top 10 retailers shop only on mobile devices.[ii] Your own website analytics are likely showing similar or even higher mobile traffic numbers.

What this means is that any company doing business on the internet must have an intense focus on ensuring their website performs well for mobile users, and especially users of smartphones and tablets. This is a big change from just five years ago, when many multichannel marketers were gradually rolling out mobile-specific websites.

Responsive design: an elegant path to “one web” architecture

Until recently, for many companies, a mobile website meant deploying an “m-dot” experience that was distinctly separate from the desktop version of their website. While this approach ensured an optimized experience for mobile users, its disadvantages were significant: a separate code base (development and maintenance costs); two websites to manage (content synchronization issues); and associated SEO issues. Consequently, many companies re-examined the “segmented web” strategy, leading to a major shift toward responsive web design (often called responsive design).

With responsive design, a website can configure its presentation to fit all screen sizes, ranging from a high-res desktop display to the smallest smartphone. Responsive sites are created from a single codebase and use a set of techniques that adapt the content to various screen sizes of tablets and smartphones.

The result is impressive: a website that smoothly adjusts its layout to any device, especially smartphones and tablets. It’s no surprise that marketers and e-business managers have embraced responsive design as a scalable way to deliver an excellent mobile experience from a single website code base.

There is a wealth of excellent guidance on designing websites that deliver a superior user experience on mobile devices. Using responsive techniques[iii] is generally considered a best practice for ensuring a consistent, “one web” experience across all devices. But online retailers should be aware that the ‘one size fits all’ approach—that is so appealing for website designers—also has some significant downsides.

  1. Development time: Responsive design typically requires a large-scale rebuild of a company’s web presence. From UI/UX design to the final testing phase, there are many things that go into the development of a good responsive site that ensures the experience is optimized for a wide variety of devices.
  2. Contextual challenge: While it addresses layout problems, and elegantly expands and contracts according to a screen’s width, responsive design is a one-size-fits-all-approach that makes it difficult to optimize for special design considerations or differentiated use-cases, such as offering the customer a mobile-specific shopping experience.
  3. Performance: Responsive design forces the browser to handle the bulk of the processing work so that content is rendered appropriately on the device. The client is sent all elements of a web page, irrespective of local device capabilities, and the client must determine which layout and assets to present. For mobile devices, the result can be longer load times and Web pages that perform poorly.

Responsive design and mobile retail: do images impact performance?

We decided to take a hard look at how responsive design affects a mobile website’s performance, since load time directly affects user experience and ultimately whether a sale is made or not. Radware recently tested the load times of the top 500 retail web sites[iv] and found that pages are heavier (measured in bytes) and slower than they were just one year ago. This correlates with our own experiences. Moreover, through our work with online brands to eliminate performance issues on their websites, we noticed that the design attributes of responsive techniques were frequently the reason for slow page-load times on mobile devices.

While a number of factors can determine the overall weight of a web page, images are generally the principal contributor. This is particularly true for responsive websites, which generally serve the same content to all devices. This can lead to overly large images being served to mobile devices.

To see whether poor performance is often associated with responsive design, Trilibis conducted a survey to measure the image weight of the top responsive websites. We wanted to know:

  1. How much do images contribute to page weight on responsive websites?
  2. How much does this affect load time for different types of users?
  3. Is it possible to automatically reduce page weight (and, therefore, load time) while maintaining an excellent user experience?

You can read the entire survey here,[v] but here are the highlights:

  • 69 percent of the responsive sites we sampled were image-heavy, with images contributing to more than 50 percent of overall page weight.
  • The responsive sites we looked at generally loaded slowly on mobile phones:
  • Only 32 out of the 155 responsive sites (21 percent) responded with acceptable load times of less than 4 seconds.

–  Only 32 out of the 155 responsive sites (21 percent) responded with acceptable load times of less than 4 seconds.

–  48 percent performed poorly with load times of between 4 and 8 seconds.

–  32 percent took anywhere from 8 to 48 seconds to load, which is unacceptable for most users

We then evaluated a technique to automatically reduce image size for responsive websites. Our goal: improve the overall user experience for some real-world examples, and achieve the target load time for RWD sites on mobile devices of no more than 3-4 seconds. We selected three RWD websites: boldandnoble.com, engadget.com, and starbucks.com. For each site, we replicated each site’s content on our own webserver. We then optimized all the images used on the home page of each website, calculated the image weight savings for both desktop and mobile devices, and then calculated load times both before and after optimization. The results were noteworthy:

BoldandNoble.com

Images accounted for 2.2MB (49 percent) of the total 4.5MB home page weight. Optimization results:

  • Reduced mobile page weight from 2.2MB to 212KB (90% savings).
  • Shortened load time from 6.63 seconds to 3.912 seconds (41% reduction).

Engadget.com

Images accounted for 0.9MB (53 percent) of the total 1.7MB home page weight. Optimization results:

  • Reduced mobile page weight from 861KB to 362KB (58% savings).
  • Shortened load time from 11.814 seconds to 5.45 seconds (54% reduction).

Starbucks.com

Images accounted for 0.9MB (53 percent) of the total 1.7MB home page weight. Optimization results:

  • Reduced mobile page weight from 892KB to 90KB (91% savings).
  • Shortened load time from 4.454 seconds to 3.206 seconds (28% reduction).

Our research shows that delivering a truly exceptional user experience on the Web requires more than simply redefining layout and styling for the screen width of a particular device; it’s crucial to keep the overall page weight low. In the case of images, designers have several options:

  1. When designing a responsive website, ensure images are of an appropriate size for mobile devices.
  2. If using a web content management system, design different templates that address the wide range of devices that might access the website.
  3. Automate the image-sizing process using server-side processing techniques.

Let the server do the heavy lifting

To deliver an excellent website experience for mobile users, server-side technologies can be used in conjunction with responsive design techniques. This approach enables detection of the device characteristics of the smartphone or tablet that the visitor is using, and then fine-tuning of the user experience for that visitor.

Server-side logic enables a complete swap of crucial page elements and enables custom functionality based on local device characteristics. For example, a retailer can ensure fast presentation of a product catalog with images optimized for the accessing device. Or a content-heavy site can deliver entirely different ad placement based on device and user context.

These server-side technologies are simple to implement and use abundant server-side computing resources to optimize the image size for the accessing device before it is sent to the client. As our research shows, this approach can deliver much faster load times — and a far better experience for the user.

Trilibis is focused on creating server-side technologies that simplify multi-device development. By marrying server-side technology with responsive design techniques, your website can offer your mobile visitors the best possible mobile user experience.

 


[ii] comScore Insights, December 2013

[iv] The Great Web Slowdown, Web Performance Today, February 2014

This article was originally published in the July 2014 issue of Internet Retailing With mobile devices becoming popular for online shopping, mobile-friendly responsive design websites can deliver an excellent visual experience for visitors. However, Trilibis finds that operators of image-rich ... Read More


Trilibis Launches SNOW IO: Automatic Image Optimization That Accelerates Responsive Websites

September 24th, 2014 by

snow_io_img

Large images are often the principle cause of responsive web sites that perform poorly. SNOW IO utilizes lightweight, server-side image optimization that significantly reduces page weight and improves load time on all mobile devices.

SAN MATEO, Calif.—September 24, 2014: Trilibis, the company that makes websites device-aware, has launched SNOW® Image Optimization (SNOW IO), a lightweight, server-side plug-in that accelerates websites on mobile devices. Built specifically for responsive websites, SNOW IO works in conjunction with popular web servers to ensure each device is served only images that are optimized for its unique characteristics.

Responsive design is a website coding technique that aims to deliver the best possible website presentation across devices. It is ideal for content-centric, publishing-oriented websites. However, unless care is taken to control the size of photos and images, responsive websites can load slowly on mobile devices.

A recent Trilibis survey of top responsive websites revealed the majority has excessive page-load times — especially on smartphones and tablets. While a number of factors contribute to the overall weight of a web page, Trilibis found that the size of website images is a significant contributor to long page-load times that frustrate users.

“In a fast-paced publishing environment, especially with distributed editorial teams under deadline, it’s easy to overlook the optimization of web assets such as images. The result can be a disappointing and frustrating web experience for mobile users — our own tests show that some sites take almost a minute to load on a smartphone or tablet,” said Ted Verani, SVP of sales and marketing at Trilibis. “SNOW IO is the perfect antidote to this problem. Better still, it’s a ‘set it and forget’ server-side solution that continually ensures your responsive website serves only size-optimized images for every device.”

SNOW IO can reduce page weight from megabytes to kilobytes, and typically shortens page-load time to less than four seconds for all devices. SNOW IO has already demonstrated its effectiveness on some high-profile websites: BoldandNoble.com, Engadget.com and Starbucks.com. When SNOW IO was used to optimize the images on these sites, mobile page weight was reduced on average by 80 percent, and page-load time was reduced on average by 41 percent.

SNOW IO — fast facts

  • Works with any responsive website development framework.
  • Improves user experience and site performance for all devices and browsers: desktop, tablet, phablet, smartphone and more.
  • Resizes, compresses and generates optimized images for each device type—automatically.
  • Uses smart delivery logic to ensure each device receives only images that are optimized for it.
  • Includes flexible optimization rules, adjustable compression levels, and device-specific resizing controls (width and height).
  • No complicated client-side or server-side programming required
  • Supports CDN (content delivery network) integration.

SNOW IO installs as two lightweight server-side components:

  1. An Image Resizer module, which is installed on the servers where image files reside. It is executed once, or as needed, to resize all images and organize them locally on the web server. It can be configured to run periodically so that any new images can be resized automatically.
  2. An Image Delivery module, which is installed on the web server. This module automatically detects the end user’s device, and serves only the image optimized specifically for that device.

About the Trilibis Responsive Design Survey

In an analysis of 155 responsive websites, Trilibis found that only 21 percent of these modern websites loaded in less than four seconds on a smartphone, and that 32 percent of the sites required between 8 and 48 seconds to load. Trilibis investigated the reason for this sluggish page-load time of responsive sites and found that image size was the primary cause. To download the entire survey, click here.

About Trilibis

Trilibis develops server-side responsive design technology for businesses, brands and web development firms that need a true “One Web” website architecture. SNOW, the company’s core product, makes websites device-aware and enables developers to design high-performance websites that work flawlessly on all desktop and mobile browsers, unlocking device-specific features and functionality that make websites mobile-ready, delightful and profitable. Trilibis is a private, venture-backed company located in San Mateo, California. For more information, visit www.trilibis.com or follow @trilibismobile.

Copyright 2014 Trilibis Inc. All rights reserved. Trilibis and SNOW are trademarks of Trilibis Inc. Other trademarks are registered trademarks and the properties of their respective owners.

Twitter: .@TrilibisMobile xxx

Large images are often the principle cause of responsive web sites that perform poorly. SNOW IO utilizes lightweight, server-side image optimization that significantly reduces page weight and improves load time on all mobile devices. SAN MATEO, Calif.—September 24, 2014: Trilibis, the ... Read More


Findings of our responsive design survey, and what is coming next

April 30th, 2014 by

Last week, we published a survey called “RESPONSIVE WEB DESIGN: WHY IMAGE OPTIMIZATION IS CRUCIAL FOR A MOBILE-FRIENDLY CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE,” where we looked at the performance of responsive design websites in both desktop browsers and mobile browsers. While it’s true that many factors contribute to the overall weight of a webpage, image size is at the top of that list, with large images directly affecting load time. This is particularly true for responsive websites, which are designed to deliver an excellent visual experience across all devices. Unfortunately, this one-size-fits-all approach can often yield bloated sites that take too long to load.

To test this theory, we surveyed top-rated responsive sites to see how images were affecting their load times. First, we compiled a list of 155 prominent responsive sites based on published data from Dashburst, Econsultancy, Mobify, Search Engine Journal, and The Next Web. We then examined the total page and image weights for the home page of all 155 sites, and then measured the load time of each page on a variety of mobile devices.

An analysis of our sample revealed the good, the bad and the ugly in terms of mobile performance. The good was quite small with only 32 of the 155 sites that we analyzed, or 21%, responding with load times of less than 4 seconds; the bad included 48% of the sample with load times between 4 and 8 seconds; and 32% were downright ugly, requiring anywhere from 8 to 48 seconds to load.

GBU-pie
image-overall-chart

Furthermore, we explored whether server-side processing could lower overall page weight and improve performance on mobile devices. To determine this, we selected the most image-heavy websites (a total of 64 responsive websites), and optimized the JPEG and PNG images using resizing and image compression methods suitable for desktop machines, tablets, and smartphones.

We found that by using our own image optimization solution, we could reduce page weight by 57% for desktop sites, 74% for tablets and 77% for smartphones. What is more interesting, by using SNOW.IO, we were able to dynamically serve up optimized images at runtime with no programming or tags required. Just add SNOW.IO to your webserver and your responsive site will automatically serve an image optimized for the target device.

Indeed, the better approach when using responsive design techniques to create a site across all devices is to let the webserver (and not the mobile device) do the heavy lifting when it comes to images. You can read more about our findings in our news section or download the complete report for the detailed analysis .

If you’d like to read more about the survey, you can read articles in CMSwire, eWeek, MarketingLand, and Retail Technology.

Stay tuned for more details as we put the finishing touches on SNOW.IO.

Last week, we published a survey called “RESPONSIVE WEB DESIGN: WHY IMAGE OPTIMIZATION IS CRUCIAL FOR A MOBILE-FRIENDLY CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE,” where we looked at the performance of responsive design websites in both desktop browsers and mobile browsers. While it’s true ... Read More


Trilibis Web Performance Survey Finds 69 Percent of Responsive Design Websites Fail to Deliver Acceptable Load Times on Mobile Devices

April 21st, 2014 by

Image size found to be the principle cause of under-performing responsive websites. Use of server-side image optimization can significantly reduce page weight and improve load time on mobile devices.

SAN MATEO, Calif.—April 21, 2014: A survey published today by Trilibis found that some of the top responsive design websites are delivering unacceptable load times on mobile devices. In an analysis of 155 responsive websites, Trilibis found that only 21 percent of these modern websites were loading in less than four seconds on a smartphone, and that 32 percent of the sites required between 8 and 48 seconds to load.

Trilibis investigated the reason for this sluggish page-load time of responsive sites and found that image size was the primary cause. By analyzing page composition, Trilibis determined that the mean home page weight of the sites in the sample was 1.7MB, with a median weight of 1.2MB. Notably, this figure was considerably heavier than the 420KB average page weight of the top 30 retailers tracked on the Keynote Mobile Commerce Performance Index[i] (a well-regarded industry benchmark).

While a number of factors contribute to the overall weight of a web page, the size of images is often the primary driver. This is particularly true for responsive websites, which are often graphically complex and are designed to deliver an excellent visual experience on all devices. For desktop computers with high-bandwidth connections and abundant local resources (disk, RAM), page weight is not a major concern. But for mobile devices, the exact opposite is true.

When Trilibis examined the relationship between image weight and overall page weight of the sites in the sample, it found that images constituted more than 50 percent of overall page weight for 107 websites (69 percent of the sample). Trilibis found that, on average, images were 50–60 percent of the page weight for these responsive sites, and that load time was unacceptable when overall page weight exceeded 1 MB. In fact, 61 percent of the responsive websites in this sample served a home page of at least 1MB in size.

As part of the survey, Trilibis examined whether server-side processing could lower overall page weight and improve performance on mobile devices. To determine this, Trilibis selected the most image-heavy websites (a total of 64 responsive websites), and performed simple image optimization to reduce images to a size that would ensure excellent rendition of the website on a wide range of desktop and mobile devices.

Before server-side optimization, the total image weight of all 64 responsive websites was 115MB. Trilibis’ device detection and image optimization technology dramatically reduced the page weight for every class of device: down to 50MB for desktop browsers, 30MB for tablets, and 27MB for smartphones (a reduction in page weight of 57 percent, 74 percent and 77 percent, respectively).

The mean page weight of the 64 websites was 1.8MB; optimization reduced this to 780KB (desktop), 470KB (tablet) and 420KB (phone). To measure the reduction in load time, Trilibis applied these

optimization techniques to three sites in the sample (Boldandnoble.com, Engadget.com and Starbucks.com), and recorded site-load time reductions of several seconds.

“The mobile Web is considerably slower than its wireline counterpart,” said Ted Verani, SVP of sales and marketing at Trilibis. “By serving images and pages that are optimized for mobile devices, we see dramatic improvements in page-load time, which translates to a much better overall user experience.”

Recommendations for website designers

  1. Carefully managing image size is crucial to ensure responsive websites load quickly and deliver the best experience for mobile users.
  2. Delivering a truly exceptional user experience on the Web requires more than simply redefining layout and styling for the screen width of a particular device. A successful One Web strategy should optimize website assets for specific classes of mobile device.
  3. To optimize performance on mobile devices, consider the use of server-side technologies in conjunction with responsive design techniques. For this survey, Trilibis used SNOW (Software eNabling One Web), its server-side technology that adds automatic device detection and image optimization to responsive websites.

To download the entire survey, click here.

Survey methodology

Trilibis compiled a list of 155 prominent responsive sites based on published data from Dashburst, Econsultancy, Mobify, Search Engine Journal, and The Next Web. We then examined the total page and image weights of the home page of each of these responsive sites, and then measured the load time of each page on a mobile device. For the image optimization analysis, we optimized the JPEG and PNG images of the targeted sites using image compression and resizing methods suitable for desktop machines, tablets, and smartphones. To download the original survey, visit www.trilibis.com.

About Trilibis

Trilibis develops server-side responsive design technology for businesses, brands and web development firms that need a true “One Web” website architecture. SNOW, the company’s core product, makes websites device-aware and enables developers to design high-performance websites that work perfectly on all desktop and mobile browsers, unlocking device-specific features and functionality that make websites mobile-ready, delightful and profitable. Trilibis is a private, venture-backed company located in San Mateo, California. For more information, visit www.trilibis.com or follow @trilibismobile.

Copyright 2014 Trilibis Inc. All rights reserved. Trilibis and SNOW are trademarks of Trilibis Inc. Other trademarks are registered trademarks and the properties of their respective owners.


[i] Keynote Systems. Performance Index: Mobile Commerce (Retail) – US, March 2014

Image size found to be the principle cause of under-performing responsive websites. Use of server-side image optimization can significantly reduce page weight and improve load time on mobile devices. SAN MATEO, Calif.—April 21, 2014: A survey published today by Trilibis ... Read More


Rewards Network Deploys Trilibis SNOW to Make iDine.com Device-Aware and Boost Mobile Engagement

February 11th, 2014 by

RN-iDine-546

Trilibis™ server-side SNOW™ technology brings comprehensive mobile device awareness to iDine.com. With iDine.com now delivering a seamless experience for mobile visitors, site abandonment rates have decreased, the visitor bounce rate has been halved, and iDine.com has seen a two-fold increase in new member enrollment on mobile devices.

SAN MATEO, Calif.—February 11, 2014: Trilibis, the leader in One Web development, is enabling Rewards Network© to position its proprietary dining incentive program, iDine©, for rapid growth in a mobile-centric competitive environment. Within one month of adding Trilibis’ SNOW (Software eNabling One Web) technology, iDine program managers saw measurable improvements resulting from optimization of the website for every mobile device, ensuring that mobile visitors with any smartphone or tablet were provided the best possible experience.

The results have been impressive: a significant decrease in site abandonment and bounce rate, mobile visits are up by 66 percent, page views per visit have increased by 68 percent, and there has been a two-fold increase in new mobile member enrollments.

iDine©, Rewards Network’s proprietary dining rewards program, offers members rewards for dining at network restaurants. The iDine.com website offers a variety of features perfect for both the avid restaurant goer and the occasional diner. Users can search using various filtering options, in addition to viewing detailed restaurant descriptions featuring menus, hours, reviews, photos and geo-location services. Members who login to access their personal account can view their annual benefits summary, which includes each restaurant visited and the corresponding reward received.

“We had been noticing a steady shift in our audience to mobile devices and were not satisfied with our site usage metrics for mobile visitors. We recognized that it was not easy for our members to access key features they needed to make their dining decisions on the go,” said Kara Walsh, chief marketing officer at Rewards Network, which is based in Chicago. “The Trilibis SNOW technology enabled us to quickly add mobile-specific features to the website and to leverage our existing assets. Using one codebase, we can ensure excellent in-browser presentation on a wide range of handsets and tablets.”

Rewards Network understood that providing an optimized experience to the growing mobile segment was essential to capture new users and retain current members growing its overall loyalty program business. With PCI compliance and security also being of utmost importance, Rewards Network wanted a solution that could sit behind its firewall and take advantage of its existing back-end architecture, including established APIs.

Trilibis proposed a holistic strategy for both the mobile and tablet web experiences that leveraged its multi-device web development framework, SNOW (Software eNabling One Web). Using SNOW, Trilibis was able to deliver a high-performing site, specifically tailored to Rewards Network’s requirements.

SNOW handles all code and layout optimization on the web servers so that only those assets required by the target device are served. This minimizes the size and number of assets sent to the device and reduces page-load time. Additionally, by leveraging SNOW’s server-side post processing, Rewards Network’s additional security and integration requirements were met. Since SNOW resides at the presentation (or Web server) layer and is independent of the backend integration layer, the development team was able take advantage of the existing unified architecture and associated APIs, accelerating project completion and time to market.

“As our members increasingly use smartphone and tablets to access our websites, it’s essential that we deliver the best possible experience for these visitors,” added Walsh. “Our SNOW-powered iDine.com mobile website has enabled us to accomplish that quickly. Our members clearly appreciate the enhancements we’ve made.”

Key SNOW benefits

  • Accelerates multi-device development across PC, tablet and mobile—all from a single codebase.
  • Delivers a faster page-load time and better browser performance than existing responsive design techniques.
  • Leverages existing web assets, code and backend integration points to shorten the time to market for any website.
  • Additional server-side intelligence gives developers the ability to fine-tune the user experience by adjusting features, content or layout for specific devices.

To learn more about SNOW, visit the Code With Snow website or download the white paper.

About Rewards Network

Rewards Network is a results-driven, measurable marketing program that helps restaurants fill more tables and build a loyal customer base. Rewards Network provides access to over 3.2 million passionate diners, driving new and repeat visits by offering rewards such as airline miles, hotel points, charitable contributions and more. The company promotes over 10,000 restaurants to diners via web, email, social media, and mobile marketing, and also provides valuable customer feedback and performance tracking to help restaurants improve service and increase profits. For more information, visit www.rewardsnetwork.com or follow Rewards Network on Twitter

About Trilibis

Trilibis develops server-side responsive design technology for businesses, brands and web development firms need a true “One Web” website architecture. SNOW, the company’s core product, makes websites device-aware and enables developers to design high-performance websites that work perfectly on all desktop and mobile browsers, and to unlock device-specific features and functionality that make websites mobile-ready, delightful and profitable. Trilibis is a private, venture-backed company located in San Mateo, California. For more information, visit www.trilibis.com or follow @trilibismobile.

Copyright 2014 Trilibis Inc. All rights reserved. Trilibis and SNOW are trademarks of Trilibis Inc. Other trademarks are registered trademarks and the properties of their respective owners.

Twitter: .@RewardsNetwork uses @TrilibisMobile SNOW to boost #mobile #engagement for @iDine #loyalty program

Trilibis™ server-side SNOW™ technology brings comprehensive mobile device awareness to iDine.com. With iDine.com now delivering a seamless experience for mobile visitors, site abandonment rates have decreased, the visitor bounce rate has been halved, and iDine.com has seen a two-fold increase ... Read More


Trilibis’ Suntae Kim To Present at Mobile+Web DevCon 2014

January 28th, 2014 by

Front-end Web developers, CTOs, web architects and digital marketing professionals can learn how to make their websites device-aware and able to optimize Web content for the mobile user

SAN MATEO, Calif.—January 28, 2014: Suntae Kim, VP of professional services at Trilibis, is a featured speaker at this week’s Mobile+Web DevCon 2014 in San Francisco. Mr. Kim will present “Device-Aware Web Frameworks for Better Programming,” and discuss how to streamline website development across all devices while improving users’ experience on high-traffic e-commerce and media websites.

Mr. Kim will discuss why there has been a shift from mobile-specific websites to an efficient One Web strategy. Attendees will also learn how new server-side technology can offer the benefits of responsive design by providing a screen-centric adaption for all devices, while also delivering the additional benefits of server-side processing for faster load time and a user experience optimized for specific mobile devices. Learn more about his presentation here.

To learn more about Trilibis technology, visit the Code With Snow website or download the white paper.

Where to meet Suntae Kim and Trilibis at Mobile+Web DevCon 2014

If you are unable to attend the conference but would like to learn more about using SNOW for multi-device website development, please contact us.

Suntae Kim – bio

Suntae Kim manages professional services at Trilibis, providing multi-device One Web solutions to high-profile customers like Univision, Fandango, NBA and more. The One Web technique brings device-awareness to the web, delivering the best user experience and performance optimized for the user’s device — whether it is a desktop, tablet or smartphone.

About Trilibis

Trilibis develops server-side responsive design technology for businesses, brands and web development firms that need a true “One Web” website architecture. SNOW, the company’s core product, makes websites device-aware and enables developers to design high-performance websites that work perfectly on all desktop and mobile browsers, and to unlock device-specific features and functionality that make websites mobile-ready, delightful and profitable. Trilibis is a private, venture-backed company located in San Mateo, California. For more information, visit www.trilibis.com or follow @TrilibisMobile.

Copyright 2014 Trilibis Inc. All rights reserved. Trilibis and Snow are trademarks of Trilibis Inc. Other trademarks are registered trademarks and the properties of their respective owners.

Front-end Web developers, CTOs, web architects and digital marketing professionals can learn how to make their websites device-aware and able to optimize Web content for the mobile user.  SAN MATEO, Calif.—January 28, 2014: Suntae Kim, VP of professional services at ... Read More


HP Autonomy Partnership

January 27th, 2014 by

Today, we formally unveiled our partnership with HP Autonomy, an enterprise software giant that is now using SNOW™ to deliver highly optimized mobile content for its TeamSite customers. We here at Trilibis are super excited to be working with the leader in the Web content management (WCM) space.

HP TeamSite already provides a wide range of capabilities to help marketers deliver more engaging customer experiences across web, email, and social media touch points. By integrating SNOW, HP enables TeamSite-powered websites to be device-aware and optimized for any mobile device, tablet or desktop browser. Even better, TeamSite users don’t need to send their website visitors to a separate m.site experience (as is currently the case for other WCM products) — HP can now offer its customers a true One Web (see W3C definition of One Web) experience across over 4,000 devices, all from within TeamSite.

This is a huge milestone for Trilibis and testimony to the power of SNOW. If you have been following Trilibis, you know that SNOW (Software eNabling One Web) technology helps to make websites device-aware from a single codebase by post processing the HTML/CSS for the specific capabilities and physical characteristics of the accessing device. This not only improves site load-time and performance, but also gives marketers complete control of the user experience for different devices — just by adding SNOW tags.

On a more personal note, everyone at HP Autonomy has been great to work with. Big thanks go out to their technical team for their teamwork with the integration of SNOW into TeamSite; and also to the HP sales team, who have been selling this integrated solution to their customers and including us in these discussions. We look forward to a long and prosperous partnership.

We hope to post updates of HP TeamSite customers that are implementing TeamSite’s new mobility features soon. Stay tuned for more!

Today, we formally unveiled our partnership with HP Autonomy, an enterprise software giant that is now using SNOW™ to deliver highly optimized mobile content for its TeamSite customers. We here at Trilibis are super excited to be working with the ... Read More



Trilibis is at Mobile + Web DevCon in San Francisco

January 27th, 2014 by

Trilibis @ DevConTrilibis is proud to sponsor this year’s Mobile + Web DevCon in San Francisco, January 28 to 30, 2014. The title of the show speaks for itself, and underscores what we at Trilibis have been talking about for some time: the fast-growing trend of diverging from fragmented websites toward a One Web approach that encompasses all devices.

 

In fact, our own Suntae Kim, VP of Professional Services, will be giving a presentation titled “Device-Aware Web Frameworks for Better Programming.” In this presentation, Suntae will explain this shift from fragmented web to a cohesive One Web strategy that delivers the best user experience on all platforms. He will also share how server-side technology can deliver the benefits of responsive design by providing a single code base that adapts to screen size, while also delivering the additional benefits of server-side processing for faster load time and user experience optimization for mobile devices. This will be followed by demo of SNOW. You can learn more about his presentation here.

If you are in San Francisco this week, and want to attend, you can register here. Drop me a line at tverani@trilibis.com if you would like to meet at the show.

If you are unable to come to the show, you can visit the Code With Snow website or download the white paper to learn more about Trilibis’ technology for making websites device-aware.

Trilibis is proud to sponsor this year’s Mobile + Web DevCon in San Francisco, January 28 to 30, 2014. The title of the show speaks for itself, and underscores what we at Trilibis have been talking about for some time: ... Read More


We Need a Web That’s Device-Aware

January 9th, 2014 by

Wired-Innovation-Insights-snippet_header
This article originally appeared on the Wired Insights blog at: http://insights.wired.com/profiles/blogs/we-need-a-web-that-s-device-aware
 
Ted Verani heads up sales and marketing here at Trilibis. He recently posted a thought-provoking article for Wired.com, in which he outlines the need for a device-aware Web. Head over to the Wired blog to post your thoughts and see comments from others.
 
We Need a Web That’s Device-Aware
 
The Web continues to mature as evolving technologies and devices shape its capabilities. From a Web 1.0 infant to a Web 2.0 toddler, websites offered interactivity to engage the viewer. With the arrival of device-aware websites, the Web has officially become a teenager, with a self-awareness that brings new levels of functionality.

Mobile Users Are Calling the Shots

It’s 2014 and I am happy to say that I no longer have to explain why companies need a mobile website. The billions of mobile devices now in the hands of consumers, ranging from top-of-the-line smartphones and tablets to low-end phones, have made a mobile website am essential component of any digital marketing strategy. Consequently, consideration of the user experience on these fast-evolving mobile devices has emerged as a major concern because these easily distracted mobile users are much less tolerant of a poor experience.


The Mobile Web’s Humble Beginnings

Until recently, for many companies, having a mobile website meant developing an “m-dot” experience that was distinctly separate from the desktop version of their website. Though this dedicated site approach can offer flexibility and control over the mobile experience, it also typically means the mobile site evolves at its own pace, often resulting in an inconsistent user experience and feature set across platforms. Additionally, the requirement to fork the code base as well as manage two websites (instead of just one) sends associated development and maintenance costs through the roof.


Digital marketers are often frustrated by multiple dedicated sites, since they now have to implement complex, cross-device URL mapping so that users shifting between different devices can get to the same content. Finally, having multiple sub-domains can also negatively impact search results as indexing becomes fragmented across the various URLs.


During the Mobile Web’s infancy this approach was adequate, but as mobile usage has taken off, many companies have started to re-examine these “segmented web” strategies. This has conveniently coincided with the explosive trend toward responsive Web design (often called responsive design, or RWD).


The Emergence of ‘One Web’

Responsive design is all about creating one website to fit all screen sizes, ranging from a giant desktop display to the smallest smartphone. Responsive sites are created from a single codebase by using proportion-based grids, flexible images, and CSS3 media queries. The device’s web browser, or “client,” uses media queries to determine the screen size and adapt the websites layout and rescale the content accordingly. For many, it is quite exciting to see a website seamlessly adapt its layout to the device at hand. The Web community at large has embraced responsive design as a scalable way to achieve a cross-device Web experience from a single code base. However, responsive design is not without its own challenges.
  1. Mobile Context: While it addresses layout problems, and elegantly expands and contracts according to a screen’s width, responsive design is a one-size-fits-all-approach that makes it difficult to optimize for design consideration or differentiated use-cases, such as offering the customer a mobile-specific shopping experience. Thus, you end up making trade-offs in your design if going responsive.
  2. Performance: Responsive design forces the browser to handle the bulk of the processing work. The client is sent the entirety of website data, irrespective of local device capabilities, and must determine which layout and assets to present. The result is longer load times and Web pages that often perform poorly on mobile handsets — a major headache for media or e-commerce companies, who pay close attention to load times to retain the attention of the fickle mobile consumer.
  3. Development time: Responsive design typically requires a large-scale rebuild of a company’s Web presence. From UI/UX design to the final testing phase, there are many things that go into the development of a good responsive site and making sure the experience is optimized for a wide variety of devices. It usually takes longer to convert an existing website into a responsive site than to build one from the ground up.
 
Responsive design is a big step in the right direction and the number of responsive sites is growing daily. However, a truly exceptional One Web experience that also addresses the unique characteristics and limitations of mobile devices requires more than just simply shifting layout and styling to conform to a device’s screen width.

Websites Become Device-Aware

Recently, responsive design methods have been augmented with server-side approaches that optimize the code for the accessing device before it is sent to the client browser. This emerging trend, sometimes called RESS (responsive design with server-side controls), can deliver much faster load times and a far better experience for the end user.


Drawing on years of developing mobile websites for our clients, the team here at Trilibis wondered how we might improve on the responsive design approach to deliver the best possible One Web experience. We talked to our clients and learned that they wanted flexibility and control. They also didn’t want to be locked into a proprietary site-building toolset, preferring instead to work directly with code. We explored the idea of enabling server-side controls and device targeting as a natural part of website development — essentially adding more intelligence to the server itself.


The result is SNOW (Software eNabling One Web) — a server-side software technology that enables delivery of optimized web content to targeted devices and browsers. With SNOW, you can create multiple web experiences with one code base under a single domain.


Here’s how it works:
  1. HTML5-compliant SNOW tags are added directly to the website HTML, CSS or UI template code. These tags specify if and how content or code blocks should be displayed on a given device, OS or browser by choosing from over 40 pre-defined device and browser groups or creating your own custom device grouping.
  2. SNOW software is installed on the Web server. This software plug-in includes over 4,000 device profiles, device taxonomy for grouping, and a high-speed content parsing engine.
  3. At runtime, SNOW detects the accessing device, scans the HTML/CSS code for device-awareness tags and post-processes it, generating only the optimized code and content appropriate for the device. This post-processing determines the layout, images, colors, and feature-set as defined by the developer for the target device group.
  4. The Web server then delivers only device-specific web assets and content for the specific device.
SNOW Advances Brands Toward a One Web Strategy

Marrying server-side technology with responsive design techniques allows the server to do the device-specific performance optimization that cannot be done using pure client-side responsive design techniques. The result is that much less data is sent to the device, resulting in fast load times (up to 2x faster), and a far better experience for the visitor. Adding server-side controls to a website’s architecture also provides more technical flexibility and the ability to fine-tune page presentation and features for the best possible cross-device Web experience.


While the Web is still a way from adulthood, companies now have the means to create exceptional Web experiences across the broad range of today’s connected devices. As development strategies continue to progress, my hope is we’ll see many more websites utilize server-side intelligence to backup their responsive design. Not just for the significant performance improvements to be had, but because this will advance our cross-device Web experiences to a more capable (and mature) Web.
This article originally appeared on the Wired Insights blog at: http://insights.wired.com/profiles/blogs/we-need-a-web-that-s-device-aware   Ted Verani heads up sales and marketing here at Trilibis. He recently posted a thought-provoking article for Wired.com, in which he outlines the need for a device-aware Web. Head over ... Read More